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SANTA ROSA, SANTA PAULA, SANTA ELENA, and SANTA LUCIA (1932, 1933)

 

This would be the first time naval architect William Francis Gibbs would work with the women who would later form the design team Smyth, Urquhart, and Marckwald.

 

Often advertised as 10,000 gross tons, this foursome actually was a little over 9,000, thus an exception to the rules laid out on the Welcome! page, though they were listed at over 11,000 gross tons after World War II. The only notable work could be found in the dining room, which had a retractable dome, situated between the funnels. M. P. Grace was created for the Santa Rosa, W. P. Grace for Santa Paula. Duplicates were created for the Elena and Lucia. The libraries were decorated with prints by Currier & Ives.

 

All four ships served as troop transports during World War II, with the Elena and Lucia sunk. Santa Rosa and Santa Paula were restored as built with exceptions made for improvements in fire protection, ventilation, and a reduction in passenger capacity.

 

Santa Rosa and Santa Paula served until 1957, when their namesakes entered service. The two were sold to the Typaldos Line, and laid up when they went out of business. Santa Rosa saw screen time in the 1980 film Raise the Titanic, playing the famous liner after she was raised.

 

ARTIST ROSTER

Charles R. Patterson

 

BASIC STATS

Length: 508'  |  Beam: 72'  |  Passengers: 290  |  9,135 gross tons  |  Speed: 18.5 knots

 

BASIC STATS - POSTWAR

Length: 508'  |  Beam: 72'  |  Passengers: 211  |  11,200 gross tons  |  Speed: 18.5 knots